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Professor Dr. Henry E. Young, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.

 

© PHOTOGRAPH of New Westminster College - Professor Dr. Henry E. Young, Ph.D. - Senior Fellow of New Westminster College - http://newwestminstercollege.ca

BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY: Professor Dr. Henry E. Young, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.

Professor Dr. Henry E. Young is a world-renowned embryologist, Professor of Anatomy, and Senior Fellow of New Westminster College. He earned a B.S. in Biology in 1974 from Ohio State University, a M.S. in Zoology and Embryology in 1977 from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, and a Ph.D. in Anatomy in 1983 from Texas Tech University, and Professor Young completed a Muscular Dystrophy Association of America Postdoctoral Fellowship from 1983 to 1985 at Case Western Reserve University and a NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship in Developmental Biology from 1985-1987 at Case Western Reserve University.

Professor Young’s discoveries include: Anti-Scarring Agent, Skeletal Muscle Morphogenetic Protein, Adult germ layer lineage mesodermal stem cells (GL-MesoSCs), Adult pluripotent epiblast-like stem cells (ELSCs), Adult totipotent blastomere-like stem cells (BLSCs), Adult pluripotent blastomeric-transitional stem cell (Tr-BLSC), 14 major stem cells and their respective 13 transitional adult stem cells within the body.

Professor Young has an distinguished record of ethical leadership and presently serves as a Tenured Professor of Anatomy in the Division of Basic Medical Sciences at the Mercer University School of Medicine in Macon, Georgia in the United States. His professional experience includes:

  • August 1988 – Present: Professor of Anatomy, Mercer University School of Medicine
  • March 2012 – September 2012: Scientific Director and Founder, Regeneration Technologies LLC
  • July 2005 – June 2012: Adjunct Professor of Anesthesiology, Mercer University School of Medicine
  • July 2004 – June 2012: Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mercer University School of Medicine 
  • July 1995 – June 2012: Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics, Mercer University School of Medicine
  • 2008 – 2011: Information Specialist, SeaChange Therapeutics
  • January 2004 – 2010: Scientific Founder and Consultant, Moraga Biotechnology Corporation
  • January 1994 – December 2004: Co-Scientific Founder and Consultant, MorphoGen Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Professor Young’s research and publications include:

1. Young, H.E.: Epidermal ridge formation during limb regeneration in the adult salamander, Ambystoma annulatum. Proceedings of the Arkansas Academy of Science, 31:107-109, 1977.

2. Young, H.E.: Anomalies during limb regeneration in the adult salamander, Ambystoma annulatum. Proceedings of the Arkansas Academy of Science, 31:110- 111, 1977.

3. Young, H.E.: Limb Regeneration in the Adult Salamander, Ambystoma annulatum Cope 1889 (Amphibia:Ambystomatidae). University of Arkansas Library Press, Copyright -1977.

4. Young, H.E., Bailey, C.F., Dalley, B.K.: Environmental conditions prerequisite for complete limb regeneration in the postmetamorphic adult land-phase salamander, Ambystoma. Anatomical Record, 206:289-294, 1983.

5. Young, H.E., Bailey, C.F., Dalley, B.K.: Gross morphological analysis of limb regeneration in postmetamorphic adult Ambystoma. Anatomical Record, 206:295-306, 1983.

6. Young, H.E.: A Temporal Examination of Glycoconjugates During the Initiation Phase of Limb Regeneration in Adult Ambystoma. Texas Tech University Library Press, Copyright – 1983. Henry E. Young, Ph.D.

7. Young, H.E., Dalley, B.K., Markwald, R.R.: Identification of hyaluronate within peripheral nervous tissue matrices during limb regeneration. Edited by Coates, P.W., Markwald, R.R., Kenny, A.D., Alan R. Liss, Inc., New York. In: Developing and Regenerating Vertebrate Nervous Systems, Neurology and Neurobiology, 6:175-183, 1983.

8. Young, H.E., Bailey, C.F., Markwald, R.R., Dalley, B.K.: Histological analysis of limb regeneration in postmetamorphic adult Ambystoma. Anatomical Record, 212:183-194, 1985.

9. Young, H.E., Carrino, D.A., Caplan, A.I.: Initial characterization of small proteoglycans synthesized by embryonic chick leg muscle-associated connective tissues. Connective Tissue Research, 17:99-118, 1988.

10. Young, H.E., Dalley, B.K., Markwald, R.R.: Effect of selected denervations on glycoconjugate composition and tissue morphology during the initiation phase of limb regeneration in adult Ambystoma. Anatomical Record, 223:223-230, 1989.

11. Young, H.E., Dalley, B.K., Markwald, R.R.: Glycoconjugates in normal wound tissue matrices during the initiation phase of limb regeneration in adult Ambystoma. Anatomical Record, 223:231-241, 1989.

12. Young, H.E., Young, V.E., Caplan, A.I.: Comparison of fixatives for maximal retention of glycoconjugates for autoradiography, including use of sodium sulfate to release unincorporated radiolabeled [35S] sulfate. Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, 37:223-228, 1989.

13. Young, H.E., Carrino, D.A., Caplan, A.I.: Histochemical analysis of newly synthesized and resident sulfated glycosaminoglycans during musculogenesis in the embryonic chick leg. Journal of Morphology, 201:85-103, 1989.

14. Young, H.E., Carrino, D.A., Caplan, A.I.: Changes in synthesis of sulfated glycoconjugates during muscle development, maturation, and aging in embryonic to senescent CBF-1 mouse. Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, 53:179-193, 1990.

15. Young, H.E., Morrison, D.C., Martin, J.D., and Lucas, P.A.: Cryopreservation of embryonic chick myogenic lineage-committed stem cells. Journal of Tissue Culture Methods, 13:275-284, 1991.

16. Shoptaw, J.H., Bowerman, S., Young, H.E. Young, Lucas, P.A.: Use of gelfoam as a substrate for osteogenic cells of marrow. Surgical Forum XLII:537-538, 1991.

17. Bowerman, S.G., Taylor, S.S., Putnam, L., Young, H.E., Lucas, P.A.: Transforming growth factor-b (TGF-b) stimulates chondrogenesis in cultured embryonic mesenchymal cells. Surgical Forum XLII:535-536, 1991.

18. Young, H.E., Sippel, J., Putnam, L.S., Lucas, P.A., Morrison, D.C.: Enzyme-linked immuno-culture assay. Journal of Tissue Culture Methods, 14:31-36, 1992. Henry E. Young, Ph.D.

19. Young, H.E., Ceballos, E.M., Smith, J.C., Lucas, P.A., Morrison, D.C.: Isolation of embryonic chick myosatellite and pluripotent stem cells. Journal of Tissue Culture Methods, 14:85-92, 1992.

20. Young, H.E., Ceballos, E.M., Smith, J.C., Mancini, M.L., Wright, R.P., Ragan, B.L., Bushell, I., Lucas, P.A.: Pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells reside within avian connective tissue matrices. In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, 29A:723-736, 1993.

21. Pate, D.W., S.S. Southerland, D.A. Grande, H.E. Young, P.A. Lucas: Isolation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from rabbit muscle. Surgical Forum, XLIV: 587-589,1993.

22. Rogers, J.J., Adkison, L.R., Black, A.C., Jr., Lucas, P.A., Young, H.E.: Differentiation factors induce expression of muscle, fat, cartilage, and bone in a clone of mouse pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells. The American Surgeon 61(3):1-6, 1995.

23. Young, H.E., Mancini, M.L., Wright, R.P., Smith, J.C., Black, A.C., Jr., Reagan, C.R., Lucas, P.A. Mesenchymal stem cells reside within the connective tissues of many organs. Developmental Dynamics 202:137-144, 1995.

24. Black, A.C., Jr., Goolsby, L.W., Cohen, G.A., Young, H.E. Effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on the hippocampal neurochemistry of albino rats at 90 days of postnatal age. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 173:514-519, 1995.

25. Lucas, P.A., Calcutt, A.F., Southerland, S.S., Warejcka, D., Young, H.E.: A population of cells resident within embryonic and newborn rat skeletal muscle is capable of differentiating into multiple mesodermal phenotypes. Wound Repair and Regeneration 3:457-468, 1995.

26. Warejcka, D.J., Harvey, R., Taylor, B.J., Young, H.E., Lucas, P.A. A population of cells isolated from rat heart capable of differentiating into several mesodermal phenotypes. J. Surg. Res. 62:233-242, 1996.

27. Lucas, P.A., Warejcka, D.J., Zhang, L-M., Newman, W.H., Young, H.E.: Effect of rat mesenchymal stem cells on the development of abdominal adhesions after surgery. J. Surg. Res. 62:229-232, 1996.

28. Lucas, P.A., Warejcka, D.J., Young, H.E., Lee, B.Y. Formation of abdominal adhesions is inhibited by antibodies to transforming growth factor-beta1. J. Surg. Res. 65:135-138, 1996.

29. Dixon, K., Murphy, R.W., Southerland, S.S., Young, H.E., Dalton, M.L., Lucas, P.A.: Recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and 4 (rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-4) induce several mesenchymal phenotypes in culture. Wound Repair and Regeneration 4:374-380, 1996. Henry E. Young, Ph.D.

30. Young, H.E., Wright, R.P., Mancini, M.L., Lucas, P.A., Reagan, C.R., Black, A.C., Jr.: Bioactive factors affect proliferation and phenotypic expression in pluripotent and progenitor mesenchymal stem cells. Wound Repair and Regeneration 6(1):65-75, 1998.

31. Young, H.E., Rogers, J.J., Adkison, L.R., Lucas, P.A., Black, A.C., Jr. Muscle morphogenetic protein induces myogenic gene expression in Swiss-3T3 cells. Wound Rep Reg 6(6):543-554, 1998.

32. Young, H.E., Steele, T., Bray, R.A., Detmer, K., Blake, L.W., Lucas, P.A., Black, A.C., Jr. Human progenitor and pluripotent cells display cell surface cluster differentiation markers CD10, CD13, CD56, CD90 and MHC Class-I. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 221:63-71, 1999.

33. Young, H.E. Pluripotent stem cells. Edited by M.A. Brown and S. Neufield, Cambridge Healthtech Institute Press, Newton Upper Falls, MA. In: Second Annual Symposium on Tissue Engineering / Regenerative Healing / Stem Cell Biology, 469-530, 1999.

34. Young, H.E. Stem cells and tissue engineering. In: Gene Therapy in Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine, J. Huard and F.H. Fu, eds., Springer-Verlag New York, Inc., Chap. 9, pg. 143-173, 2000.

35. Young, H.E., Duplaa, C., Young, T.M., Floyd, J.A., Reeves, M.L., Davis, K.H., Mancini, G.J., Eaton, M.E., Hill, J.D., Thomas, K., Austin, T., Edwards, C., Cuzzourt, J., Parikh, A., Groom, J., Hudson, J., Black, A.C., Jr. Clonogenic analysis reveals reserve stem cells in postnatal mammals. I. Pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells. Anat. Rec. 263:350-360, 2001.

36. Young, H.E., Steele, T., Bray, R.A., Hudson, J., Floyd, J.A., Hawkins, K., Thomas, K., Austin, T., Edwards, C., Cuzzourt, J., Duenzl, M., Lucas, P.A., Black, A.C. Jr. Human reserve pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells are present in the connective tissues of skeletal muscle and dermis derived from fetal, adult, and geriatric donors. Anat. Rec. 264:51-62, 2001.

37. Romero-Ramos M, Vourc’h P, Young HE, Lucas PA, Wu Y, Chivatakarn O, Zaman R, Dunkelman N, El-Kalay MA, Chesselet M-F Neuronal differentiation of stem cells isolated from adult muscle. J Neurosci Res 69:894-907, 2002.

38. Young HE. Existence of reserve quiescent stem cells in adults, from amphibians to humans. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 280:71-109, 2004.

39. Young HE, Black Jr AC. Adult stem cells. Anat. Rec. 276A:75-102, 2004.

40. Young HE, Duplaa C, Romero-Ramos M, Chesselet M-F, Vourc’h P, Yost MJ, Ericson K, Terracio L, Asahara T, Masuda H, Tamura-Ninomiya S, Detmer K, Bray RA, Steele TA, Hixson D, El-Kalay M, Tobin BW, Russ RD, Horst MN, Floyd JA, Henson NL, Hawkins KC, Groom J, Parikh A, Blake L, Bland LJ, Thompson AJ, Kirincich A, Moreau C, Hudson J, Bowyer III FP, Lin TJ, Black Jr AC. Adult reserve stem cells and their potential for tissue engineering. Cell Biochem Biophys, 40(1):1-80, 2004. Henry E. Young, Ph.D.

41. Young HE, Duplaa C, Yost MJ, Henson NL, Floyd JA, Detmer K, Thompson AJ, Powell SW, Gamblin TC, Kizziah K, Holland BH, Boev A, Van de Water JM, Godbee DC, S. Jackson, M. Rimando, Edwards CR, Wu E, Cawley C, Edwards PD, Macgregor A, Bozof R, Thompson TM, Petro Jr GJ, Shelton HM, McCampbell BL, Mills JC, Flynt FL, Steele TA, Kearney M, Kirincich-Greathead A, Hardy W, Young PR, Amin AV, Williams RS, Horton MM, McGuinn S, Hawkins KC, Ericson K, Terracio L, Moreau C, Hixson D, Tobin BW, Hudson J, Bowyer III FP, Black Jr AC. Clonogenic analysis reveals reserve stem cells in postnatal mammals. II. Pluripotent epiblastic-like stem cells. Anat. Rec. 277A:178-203, 2004.

42. Vourc’h P, Romero-Ramos M, Chivatakarn O, Young HE, Lucas PA, El-Kalay M, Chesselet M-F. Isolation and characterization of cells with neurogenic potential from adult skeletal muscle. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 317:893-901, 2004.

43. Seruya M, Shah A, Pedrotty D, du Laney T, Melgiri R, McKee JA, Young HE, Niklason LE. Clonal Population of adult stem cells: life span and differentiation potential. Cell Transplant 13:93-101, 2004

44. Young HE and Black AC Jr. Differentiation potential of adult stem cells. In: Contemporary Endocrinology: Stem Cells in Endocrinology, L.B. Lester, ed., The Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ. Chap. 4, p. 67-92, 2005.

45. Vourc’h P, Lacar B, Mignon L, Lucas PA, Young HE, Chesselet MF. Effect of neurturin on mulitpotent cells isolated from the adult skeletal muscle. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 332:215-223, 2005.

46. Henson NL, Heaton ML, Holland BH, Hawkins KC, Rawlings B, Eanes E, Bozof R, Powell S, Grau R, Fortney J, Peebles B, Kumar D, Yoon JI, Godby K, Collins JA, Sood R, Bowyer 3rd

Henson NL, Heaton ML, Holland BH, Hawkins KC, Rawlings B, Eanes E, Bozof R, Powell S, Grau R, Fortney J, Peebles B, Kumar D, Yoon JI, Godby K, Collins JA, Sood R, Bowyer 3rd FP, Black Jr AC, Young HE. Karyotypic analysis of adult pluripotent stem cells. Histology and Histopathology, 20: 769-784, 2005.

47. Mignon L, Vourc’h P, Romero-Ramos M, Osztermann P, Young HE, Lucas PA, Chesselet MF. Transplantation of multipotent cells extracted from adult skeletal muscles into the adult subventricular zone of adult rats. J Comp Neurol 491:96-108, 2005.

48. Young HE, Duplaa C, Katz R, Thompson T, Hawkins KC, Boev AN, Henson NL, Heaton M, Sood R, Ashley D, Stout C, Morgan JH, Uchakin PN, Rimando M, Long GF, Thomas C, Yoon JI, Park JE, Hunt DJ, Walsh NM, Davis JC, Lightner JE, Hutchings AM, Murphy ML, Boswell E, McAbee JA, Gray BM, Piskurich J, Blake L, Collins JA, Moreau C, Hixson D, Bowyer FP, Black AC Jr. Adult-derived stem cells and their potential for tissue repair and molecular medicine. J Cell Molec Med 9:753-769, 2005.

49. Young HE, Black AC Jr. Adult-derived stem cells. Minerva Biotechnologica 17:55-63, 2005. Henry E. Young, Ph.D.

50. Stout CL, Ashley DW, Morgan III JH, Long GF; Collins JA, Limnios JI, Lochner F, McCommon G, Hixson D, Black Jr AC, Young HE. Primitive stem cells reside in adult swine skeletal muscle and are mobilized into the peripheral blood following trauma. American Surgeon 73 (11):1106-1110, 2007.

51. ICMS Stem Cell Lab Practices Guidelines, Version 1.0. Authors: Christopher J. Centeno MD, Michelle Cheever, Wayne Marasco MD PhD, John F Wong PhD, Henry E Young PhD, 18 pgs, © 2009, The International Cellular Medicine Society. (Invited)

52. Vourc’h P, Mignon L, Lucas PA, Young HE, Chesselet MF. Cells isolated from adult skeletal muscle express markers of differentiated neurons after transplantation into the adult hippocampus. (In press).

53. Young HE and Black Jr. AC. Naturally occurring adult pluripotent stem cells. In: Encyclopedia of Molecular Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, manuscript number c108, WILEY-BLACKWELL, Invited (In Press), 2012. 

Professor Young’s honours and awards include:

  • 2012: Senior Fellow, New Westminster College, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2009: The International Albert Einstein Iconic Achiever Award for work in Adult Stem Cell Biology
  • 2005: Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Society
  • 2005: The Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award
  • 2002:  All Things Considered, National Public Radio
  • 1996: American Medical Women’s Association Gender Equity Award, Men of Achievement, 17th Ed.
  • 1993 and 1994: MUSM Hooding Award
  • 1993: Certificate of Merit  for Work in Adult Salamander Regeneration, Cambridge, England

As a Senior Fellow of New Westminster College, Professor Dr. Henry E. Young is dedicated to supporting the highest standards of academic excellence and is committed to the advancement of New Westminster College and its Global Network of Fellows.

 
 

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